Two examples of why interferences are important and a comment about a “novel approach” to interferences

September 29, 2017

I had occasion to read an open access paper “full method validation in clinical chemistry.” So with that title, one expects the big picture and this is what this paper has. But when it discusses analytical method validation, the concept of testing for interfering substances is missing. Precision, bias, and commutability are the topics covered. Now one can say that an interference will cause a bias and this is true but nowhere do these authors mention testing for interfering substances.

The problem is that eventually these papers are turned into guidelines, such as ISO 15197, which is the guideline for glucose meters. And this guideline allows 1% of the results to be unspecified (it used to be 5%). This means that an interfering substance could cause a large error resulting in serious harm in 1% of the results. Given the frequency of glucose meter testing, this translates to one potentially dangerous result per month for an acceptable (according to ISO 15197) glucose meter. If one paid more attention to interfering substances and the fact that they can be large and cause severe patient harm, the guideline may have not have allowed 1% of the results to remain unspecified.

I attended a local AACC talk given by Dr. Inker about GFR. The talk, which was very good had a slide about a paper about creatinine interferences. After the talk, I asked Dr. Inker how she dealt with creatinine interferences on a practical level. She said there was no way to deal with this issue, which was echoed by the lab people there.

Finally, there is a paper by Dr. Plebani, who cites the paper: Vogeser M, Seger C. Irregular analytical errors in diagnostic testing – a novel concept. (Clin Chem Lab Med 2017, ahead of print). Ok, since this is not an open access paper, I didn’t read it but what I can tell from Dr. Plebani comments, the cited authors have discovered the concept of interfering substances and think that people should devote attention to it. Duh! And particularly irksome is the suggestion by Vogeser and Seger of “we suggest the introduction of a new term called the irregular (individual) analytical error.” What’s wrong with interference?

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